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at the convergence of 50 research reports that talked about the dangers of cell phone use in testinand texting devicee driving. there was so little understanding about this. we had a massive debate. we knew this was very danger is behavior based on the research. we come from at traffic safety perspective, and we know the way to change this behavior follows the formula you heard ray lahood talk about. how you do that in the framework of very little conversation was the difficult part. a year ago on january we call for a nationwide ban on told a news and text to use while driving, and we called for companies to put in place policies prohibit the use of this. it was such a long debate press because of the lack of conversation. then i look at today and what we heard from secretary lahood and others. but that the amount of activity we have heard from a state legislative point of view, a research point of view, law enforcement point of view. i encourage you as we listen to our panelists today to think about how we maintain the momentum. i think all of us know that a year of action, even a tremendou
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
. when i spoke with members of congress this morning, all of us are convinced of one thing. we have to display absolute determination, a total will that will not tell -- will not fail, and we should show absolutely no weakness in our resolution. the iranians had months and months to change their behavior. there was an extended hand by president obama. they did not grab that extended hand. these economic sanctions way as much as possible so as to bring iran to be more responsible. france's condensed -- france is convinced that nobody should display any kind of weakness. >> thank you. >> former republican vice- presidential nominee sarah palin will be in iowa tomorrow night for the annual ronald reagan dinner in the morning. we will have live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. the former alaska governor will be joined by iowa senator chuck grassley and former iowa governor terry branstad. book tv saturday night, bill clinton joins former british prime minister tony blair for a discussion of their years in office. that is on c-span-2. >> now a house hearing on a ch
their jobs. and today, mr. chairman, they are seeing us stand up for the american manufacturing and american workers and demand a level playing field and an end to china's currency manipulation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure, a deep privilege to yield a minute to our distinguished speaker, nancy pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for the recognition and of yielding of time from the distinguished chairman of the ways and means committee. w and means committee. i think him for bringing this legislation to the floor and i thank mr. murphy -- bipartisan murphys for their leadership in this important legislation. mr. speaker, for so many years, we have watched china-u.s. trade deficit grow and grow and grow. and today, we are finally doing something about it by recognizing that china's manipulation of the currency
for granted on a daily basis to live in freedom, to live in democracy. those are the ones who allow us to do. that today we have the opportunity to help make our soldiers and our veterans, to help transition them into civilian life much easier. h.r. 5282 will help to make opportunities available to the brave men and women who are returning from the fight on the global war on terror and this legislation will continue our commitment to our veterans through education and employment opportunities. and as part of the civil works mission, the corps of engineers, they uncover countless historic artifacts continuously. a lot of these artifacts, which are very important items, are frankly just uncatalogged and are just kind of almost semiabandoned and they need curation. so, this is such a commonsense bill. it helps preserve our history, preserve our past, while also making sure that we give opportunities to the most noble, to the best and the brightest of our country, to our troops and to our veterans. i urge all members to support our receipt advance and support this -- our veterans and support thi
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
with 31% of the vote. this is about an hour. >> good evening and thank you for joining us for this first gubernatorial debate. >> tonight's debate is brought to you by impact nevada. this is a partnership between ' the las vegas review journal" and pbs. >> rory reid and brian sandoval have released plans for improving education. we will hear from both candidates on this issue. >> the venue for tonight's debate, the andre agassi college preparatory academy. here is a man who really cares about education, andre agassi. [applause] >> thank you. good evening and welcome to the andre agassi college preparatory academy. i want to rory reid and brian sandoval for accepting this invitation to come here to share their thoughts on this vital issue, education. we built this school because we believe nothing has the power to change a child's life like a quality education. without an education a child cannot hope. without a quality system, a state cannot compete. the next governor will long be remembered for the effect on education. nevada is struggling economically. a huge portion of our state budge
is crossing the table. and they are able -- their business model is basically to use the power of their monopoly or duopoly position to extract more and more revenue from folks who are dependent on this service that is essential for the transaction -- the sale of gas, the sale of grocery -- to occur. and that business model that i think we have to reward is the hard work and good service and high quality and a fair price. and our merchants, individual merchants, have no capacity to protect themselves on the cost of each transaction. and when you have electronic transactions, they are pretty simple to do. there is an expense involved. the price as charged has to be fair. and unless you have a cop on the beat -- in this case, the federal reserve writing regulations to make certain the banks don't overreach so the charges are reasonable and proportionate -- you will see merchants getting hammered with because they can't control. it eats into their profits and their viability. this i think is overdue. other countries have a much lower cost per transaction, and their economies do fi
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9